A comparison of the views of karl marx and max weber on social classes

difference between karl marx and max weber social class

Conclusion Weber's discussion of class, status and party give an idea of how markets affect people, and how people form themselves into groups, partly as a result of markets and partly on the basis of other factors that are socially important.

Other parties, such as the Canadian Liberal Party or the Saskatchewan NDP attempt to put together programs which appeal to a wide variety of interests. Marx argues that there are two main groups, the bourgeoisie and the proletariat, and that it is a predictable relationship and the only way to end this power relationship is through the proletariat overthrowing the bourgeoisie.

He viewed the interaction between people and the material they worked with influence each other. Within this system of stratification, the working class does not fit, although the working class has been and continues to be an important social class in capitalism.

These could be ethnic groups, religious groups, groups around sexual orientation, and the various urban communities and groups which form around common sets of interests. Karl Marx found that class was categorised by the means of production.

Debtors represent a class situation where net assets may be positive, but where the benefit of the asset is taken by others farmers and small businesses.

But he claimed that power emerged from other economic sources, ie. In contemporary society, with great geographic and social mobility, it may be difficult to maintain this closed nature.

A comparison of the views of karl marx and max weber on social classes

Weber did not ignore economic sources of power, and considered these to be among the more important sources, especially in capitalism. If markets were allowed to operate fully, this would destroy status differences and only market considerations would influence life chances. Various religious groups may operate in this manner, with fairly close guidelines concerning who one can associate with, and with whom marriage is to be arranged. Major Classes. And iii. But he claimed that power emerged from other economic sources, ie. For political parties to gain political power, they must attempt to represent a fairly broad range of interests. Weber notes the possibility that classes may form groups, but considers this to be unlikely. The bourgeoisie are the owners of the means of production: the factories, businesses, and equipment needed to produce wealth. Weber argues that groups are more likely to be formed on the basis of status or status honour. In terms of classes, the major classes are the working class, the capitalist class, and the middle professional group. Finally, people in societies create some major parties, political parties and other organizations, each aiming to achieve some end. That is, one may consider some of the major styles of life as those of upper class, middle class, and lower class.

Various religious groups may operate in this manner, with fairly close guidelines concerning who one can associate with, and with whom marriage is to be arranged. Weber notes Giddens and Held, p.

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Multiple Sources of Power